digital limits

By accident I  discovered  the limits of the dynamic range on my Sony A7 R111 digital camera  whilst on a recent  landscape photo session in Waitpinga late this summer.  

Even though I was photographing in the early morning light,  the camera could not cope with the dynamic range between the dark shadows at the base of the cliffs and the highlights of the sun in the clouds. An example: 

The pictures  that I made when I was at the foot of the cliffs that morning were similar, only the highlights were even more burnt out. I did not realize this had happened  until I uploaded the digital files onto the computer and looked at the images on the computer screen. I eventually deleted these. 

low light situations

I have settled in using the Sony A7r111 after working with it extensively on the recent New Zealand  trip.  

I use the camera  manually, as  if it were an old fashioned Leica  rangefinder from the film era. This is crazy,  I know, but I have set camera up so that nothing is automatic.  I am however,  getting to the point of adjusting the basic menu  that was  set up  for me by the camera store when I bought the camera. I  do need  a bit more flexibility in adjusting exposures up or down in specific situations.   

What is really working for me, and what has impressed me,  is  the Sony's low light capability. This allows me, as in the above image,  to photograph hand held in low light,  whilst on the morning or afternoon poodlewalks along the southern Fleurieu Peninsula coastline.  I was scoping for a possible film shoot, given that there is low tide early in the morning at the moment.  

two versions of foam + granite

More digital black and white photography from stumbling up some foam amongst the coastal granite, just after the wet weather had eased.

This picture is a  straight conversion  from the digital file, as I am currently  unable to  access Silver Efex Pro 2  software on my  iMac, which is  running  the High Sierra Operating system. Unfortunately I have never found any software package that can produce black and white conversions that are as good as those created by Silver Efex Pro 2.

At least I am able to use the standalone Adobe Lightroom 6 that I recently purchased from B+H with my  recent film order on the  iMac.   I reckon it is a case of waiting  for a black and white conversion as there is good news around the corner: DxO has acquired the NiK collection and it's upgraded version will be released in mid-2018. I doubt that the software  will be free. 

DxO is a French company that performs extensive scientific testing on camera image sensors and lenses. The information and knowledge that DxO glean from their tests is used to produce a raw processing software packages called  – DxO Optics Pro.

Petrel Cove: am

This seascape is Petrel Cove in the early morning. It is part of the Fleurieuscapes  project that I have been working on  since we shifted to living at Victor Harbor. 

The picture  was made when I  had returned to  the car after a  poodle walk  along Deps Beach with Ari and Kayla. I was taken by the softness and the quality of the light. 

The sea is a big part of the southern Fleurieu Peninsula ---playing on the beach, fishing, surfing etc-- and I struggle to find  a way to photograph  it. How do you do it? It's a slow working it out and hoping that an opening will eventuate. The opening would be  a photograph that's a doorway that is photographically interesting.

The classic seaside/beach photography project is  Joel Meyerowitz's  1979 book Cape Light: a book of  colour photographs of the seaside resort of Provincetown, Cape Cod and its soft natural light  made in the summer of 1976 with an 8x10. It is  considered a classic work of colour photography and the  8 x 10  camera meant  that his  stance  towards  summer cottages and ice cream shops  was both one of patience and meditative.  The images are  in and around his house in Cape Cod and  the mood is one of languid, forever-long summer days. These are not really colorised or pumped up. 

shifting to Victor Harbor

The shift from living in the Sturt St apartment  in Adelaide's  CBD to  the house at Victor Harbor  is currently under way.  The townhouse will go on the market in mid-January. 

All the computers, scanners   and camera equipment now reside at Encounter Studio.   This  means that Encounter Studio will  eventually become the centre of my photography,  rather than what I do when I'm here at Encounter Bay for a few days every second weekend.  What will become secondary will be the urban photography,  as that now requires travelling up to the CBD or to Melbourne.

There has been little large format photography done because the shift taking place is teaching up my time and energy.   But  there is this possibility  for an 8x10 shoot that I came across  when I was looking through the 2014 digital archives just before  the Xmas break for what I'd scoped with the digital camera for  large format  photography. 

I went back and had a look over Xmas after walking the dogs at Kings Beach in the afternoon,  but  a quick glance indicated that the tree had been cut down.  I'll have to check the location more thoroughly. If  the  pine tree has  gone, then that is the end of that possibility for an 8x10.